Elkhart Clarinet Bb 100CL Outfit

£219.00

This Elkhart Clarinet Bb 100CL offers a well-built instrument at a very competitive price, suitable for Schools, Windbands and Music Education Services. The easy to play ABS / Ebonite composite body has a wood-grain finish and offers a rugged and long-lasting instrument, which provides a warm and full tone often associated with more expensive Grenadilla Clarinets.

ABS body, .583″ Bore, Straight Tone Holes, Silver-Plated keys, Bb, Moulded Mouthpiece with a Soft Backpack-Style Case.

Only 1 left in stock

Description

Elkhart Clarinet Bb 100CL Outfit

This Elkhart Clarinet Bb 100CL offers a well-built instrument at a very competitive price, suitable for Schools, Windbands and Music Education Services. The easy to play ABS / Ebonite composite body has a wood-grain finish and offers a rugged and long-lasting instrument, which provides a warm and full tone often associated with more expensive Grenadilla Clarinets.

ABS body, .583″ Bore, Straight Tone Holes, Silver-Plated keys, Bb, Moulded Mouthpiece with a Soft Backpack-Style Case.


TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

  • Reliable and Well Designed Student Clarinet
  • Wood-grain Finish
  • ABS Body with Silver-Plated Keywork
  • 17 Key Boehm System
  • Key of: Bb
  • Includes a Plastic Mouthpiece, Adjustable Metal Ligature and Care Kit
  • Supplied with a Quality Backpack Style Case with an Adjustable Shoulder Strap for Convenience

The clarinet is a musical-instrument family belonging to the group known as the woodwind instruments. The clarinet has a single-reed mouthpiece, a straight cylindrical tube with an almost cylindrical bore, and a flared bell. A person who plays a clarinet is called a clarinetist (sometimes spelled clarinettist). The cylindrical bore of the clarinet is primarily responsible for the clarinet’s distinctive timbre, which varies between its three main registers, known as the chalumeau, clarion, and altissimo. The tone quality of the clarinet can vary greatly with the clarinetist, music, instrument, mouthpiece, and reed. The differences in instruments and geographical isolation of clarinetists led to the development from the last part of the 18th century onwards of several different schools of playing.